Why Your Customer’s “Journey Of Trust” Matters In The Buying Process

From the desk of Razvan Rogoz,

In my last post, I have made it clear that holding to customers is always a superior strategy to getting new customers, as lead generation comes with a cost. In this post, I am taking the post important concept from the article – progression of trust and I’m developing it.

Can you tell me what trust is? It is hard to define. It is an intangible, like happiness. Trust in my words can be defined as the willingness to accept that what another person is true. We rarely think about it in an analytical manner and yet, trust, the concept of trust is one of the things that makes the world go round.

Let’s use a dating analogy. Virtually everything in sales can be related to dating. You are a guy. You meet a girl. At first, she doesn’t know a lot about you. She doesn’t trust you. She doesn’t say yes easily to you. You get to know her. She gets to know you. You spend time together. A first kiss. A first night together. She trusts you more and more. She opens up more and more. She becomes vulnerable.

This teaches us something about selling. In marketing or sales, the idea of trust is how vulnerable an individual is willing to be in front of a vendor, how much an individual is willing to risk to receive a desired benefit. In the first stages of a business relationship, trust is low so only low ticket products are sold. The prospect is vulnerable to losing only small amounts of money. Each time he buys something and is satisfied with the result, more trust is created. In this manner, just like a couple can move from holding hands to spending the night together, a customer can move from buying a $20/book to spending $10.000 for a seminar.

Amateurs think that the $10.000 ticket is sold because his needs grew to that level. The truth is that his needs were at that level at all times because it is impossible to create a need in the marketplace through marketing alone. Marketing can only take an existing need and amplify it towards making a sale. He could have benefited from the $10.000 product in the first day. The reason he did not buy it wasn’t that the benefits weren’t there but because there was no enough trust to make this particular purchase.

Everything you’re selling at this moment, ranging from one hour of coaching for $50 to a three weeks platinum retreat for $19.997 can and will benefit the prospect. Most product chains are not designed to fulfill growing needs but rather, to fulfill a need at a different level of effectiveness. In other words, you have excellent solutions, you have good solutions, you have decent solutions for the same particular problem.

Traditional thinking say that price is what determines if the prospect will buy a premium, standard or sub-par solution. Price has a lot to do with it and yes, price does influence buying decisions, up to a point. What really matters though is the perception of value (what he is feeling that he’s getting for the money) and the level of trust he has in you as a vendor. The perception of value dictates that in order for a solution to feel appealing, it must be worth to him multiples of what he is paying and this is true no matter if it is a $10 or a $10.000 product. The entire idea of “it is a good deal” refers to perceived emotional value and not actual price, otherwise, there would be no market for anything above $500 and people would find it kind of hard to say “The room at <Insert Luxury Hotel Name Here> that had just cost me $1249 is a really good deal. It is a good deal because he feels he’s getting an experience worth $5000 or $10.000, not because of the base price.

Getting back to the idea of trust, how much people trust you will determine how much they’ll buy. Each time they’ll get the desired benefit from your product, they’ll buy more. Each time you disappoint them, they’ll buy less. Of course, there is a limit because even if someone trusts you completely but they live on a $60.000 yearly salary, they can’t spend $10.000 on your seminar but all things being equal, the progress of trust is what makes or breaks the profitability of a customer relationship.

This is one of the reasons why brands command premium prices. A brand is nothing more than established trust in the mind of the consumer. It is a symbol that other people picked this product and were satisfied with the results obtained. Branding is a boost to the progression of trust scale, putting the prospect in a position higher than if he would try the product for himself, the first time. You buy a luxury sedan because you know the name behind it. Without that name, you’d have to be persuaded more to purchase.

When I’ve bought my first MacBook, I’ve bought it based on the name of the brand alone. I’ve never tried or tested Macs before and yet, I’ve paid an obscene sum of money to Apple simply because I was familiar with their brand and this acted as a replacement of the progression of trust process.

My point here is very simple. Trust exists in all areas of life, not just business. To get people to do what you want them to do, there must be trust. Trust is built through delivery of the desired benefits, through a strong brand and through other factors. The more time you spend with a customer and the more positive experiences this given customer has, the more likely he is to answer a positive when you’re promoting a higher ticket product.

Think of it as a scale from 1 to 100. Selling a $10 product requires a trust level of 5. Selling a $500 one requires a trust level of 100. You need to bridge the gap between 5 and 100 with products that gradually build trust and buying compliance.

How do you do this? Let’s have a talk just about this topic. As a marketing consultant and direct response copywriter it is my job to help you build the systems, the materials, the mediums required to attract more customers, sell products of higher value to them and keep them on board as long as humanly possible.

I would like to invite you to a complimentary 30 minute call on Skype where we can discuss about your business. I’m going to do a diagnostic of your current circumstances and then determine what would be the best approach or course of action in order to accomplish your given goals.

Click Here For Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call!

Best regards,
Razvan Rogoz
The Self-Improvement Copywriter

Click Here For Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call!

How Many Customers Do You Keep?

From the desk of Razvan Rogoz,

I’m currently waiting for customer support. I’m trying to get into contact with a leading financial provider, because they’ve shipped my debit card to a wrong address. I’ve been waiting for 30 minutes and I have 20 minutes remaining. The level of frustration I’m experiencing now made me want to share a very important lesson from my experience as a copywriter.

I’ve been in the position to work with amazing customers, businesses and people. In the first month, it was okay. In the second month, it was okay. Then, ironically, the better the relationship was, the less I was invested in it. If in the past I used to reply to emails within hours, I started replying in days or not replying at all. If deadlines were sacred for me, I’ve started missing them, not by days but by weeks.

This happened years ago, when in all matters and purposes, I was just a young adult. It happened at the beginning of my career as a copywriter. Yet, it is a lesson that I’ve learned very fast. People have expectations from you and if you want to keep those people paying you, you must satisfy them. In a way, it is similar to dating. In the beginning, he’s bringing her flowers. He’s taking her to dinner. He’s doing everything in her power to impress her. Maybe he even starts going to the gym.

After they get married, he stops doing all those things and watches TV all day. The same happens with most solopreneurs or self-employed. The more a client is invested, the more a client pays, the lower the quality of service that person gets.

And honestly, this is the worst thing you can possibly do. I was talking about this key concept a few days ago with a copywriting student of mine. I was explaining to him that the natural impulse is that when you finish a work, a project, is to go and find another person to work with. The rational and logical thing is that if someone paid you, that person is happy with your work, to find something else to do for the same person and to not spend 4 – 5 hours in lead generation and qualification when you can simply continue an existing relationships.

It is counter-intuitive but when it comes to customers, focus your efforts on keeping the ones you have and less on getting new customers. It is the most common sense thing in marketing yet so few people understand it. Your priority comes in the form of those that already pay you and are engaged in a relationship with you. They are putting the food on the table and your revenue comes as a consequence of having them. So serve them, keep them happy, find more ways to help them (while getting paid) and keep them on board as much as possible.

As a coach or trainer, it is not a big accomplishment to get 20 new customers in a month. If we were in the same place, I would show you how one day of cold calling can bring you 20 new customers. This is not an accomplishment because it is a game of numbers. The big accomplishment is developing a relationship of trust and mutual benefit with each of the people you work.

Why? Because a person that just entered the door may buy your $19.97 eBook but a person that has been with you for three years will invest in your $1997 workshop. How much someone is willing to pay with you is based on trust, not good marketing. Sales funnels are designed to sell products that start cheap and end expensive, not to promote the high ticket option at the beginning. Someone like Tony Robbins may sell a $3000 retreat directly to a cold lead because he is Tony Robbins and everyone knows him but most people have to gradually build a relationship based on increasingly higher products that build trust and value.

It is hard to sell the high option to someone from the start and each time you focus on bringing new customers, you are reseting that counter. It is like someone who got 40 kilometers into a 42 kilometer race and then goes back to the beginning.

Every business consultant knows that you don’t judge a business’s health by revenue because you can have $1.000.000 revenue on $1.200.000 costs. You don’t even judge it on profit because it is too general. You judge it on two things – ROI, what you’re getting out for what you’re putting in and how long your customers stayed with you. While your CPA is not going to put this in your financial statement, it is the best way to determine where a business is heading and how healthy it is. A high turn-over of clients in a consulting based business means that clients are not satisfied, are not treated right or that there are not enough products and services to satisfy their needs long term.

My focus as a marketer is to maximize customer lifetime value a lot more than getting new customers. There are some fields where new customers is everything, like in software or in online platforms. In my field, I would rather get five people now and work with them for 24 months than get two people per month, for the next two years.

There is yet another reason why this makes sense. There is a cost with every new customer. This cost is first in the form of marketing, getting him to become a lead. Second is the sales process. Third is getting to know this person, as you can’t quite help someone before becoming very familiar with their problems. In some businesses, this cost is higher than the front-end value of the transaction, leading to what is called “a loss leader”.

It is not virtue how many people you serve. It is how well you serve them. The focus on size is like an obsession in the business world, most define success by how big they are. In practice, size and success have little to do in common, you can have a 10.000 people company that is going under. ROI is what determines value and a ROI of 50% on a company of five people is far better than a ROI of 10% on a company of 100 people. A true achievement is to have 10 people that you’ve helped for five years in a row, selling higher and higher priced services and them coming back to you because no matter how much you charge, they know that what you’re doing works very well.

Saying that I’m working with 50 customers in a year is not praise. It means that I either don’t know how to sell to them, I can’t identify needs that I can help them with or I do something that makes them leave. Saying that I’m working with only five people means exactly the opposite. And yes, after I’ve ended my “young and dumb” period, I’ve realized that this is the solution and in all honesty, while I don’t know your specific business model and product line, I tend to think this is the solution for you too – maximizing customer value and serving a particular customer for as long as humanly possible, instead of replacing him with a new customer at the beginning of the trust scale.

When you’re using economy of scale (distributing fixed overhead over a large number of products), then size matters and customer acquisition may be more important. When your product doesn’t have a follow-up (like a writer selling a single book), then getting market share is more important. But as a coach, as a trainer, as someone who sells his or her time in exchange for money, the best thing you can do for yourself and for your market is serving a few people for a long time as opposed to many people for a short time.

This is a mistake I’ve done and I regret dearly and only by doing it, I know how important is to nurture commercial relationships instead of constantly seeking new ones.

Let’s see how you can do this in your own business? I’m giving you a complimentary 30 minute session in which we’ll discuss ways to maximize customer value and other means in which you can succeed, from a marketing and copywriting point of view, in your coaching or training business.

Please use the link below to get started.

Click Here For Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call!

Best regards,
Razvan Rogoz
The Self-Improvement Copywriter

Click Here For Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call!

The Best Sales Systems Get The Best Customers.

From the desk of Razvan Rogoz,

A few weeks ago, I’ve ran an analysis over my CRM. I was doing this in order to understand what business sectors are most people with whom I’ve made contact.

The results were predictable. Most are in digital publishing, some are software developers and some are coaches, trainers and speakers. A light-bulb went off then, lighting the entire room in which I was working.

Ding. This analysis is false. These people are not trainers, speakers or digital publishers. These are only the products they are selling, the value they create to the marketplace. Every single one of the people in my CRM list with a C-level position was in the same field – sales.

Now you may tell … “Uhm, sorry Razvan, that doesn’t sound right, unless all your contacts are salespeople”. I wouldn’t blame you for thinking this but the truth is – every single person I know is selling. That’s his or her business. The CEO is selling ideas to investors and partners. The manager is selling the plan to his employees. The freelancer is selling his time to potential customers.

Every single person that is self-employed or is in the leadership position of an organization is doing the same thing 90% of the time – selling. Yes, some may sell ideas while others may sell products or services but the same is true, nothing ever happens until person A persuades person B to act on something.

I’m a direct response copywriter. What is my job? For people outside of this field it may be to write. For me, it is selling. 90% of everything I’m doing involves selling something to someone. I must sell to my customers on why they must hire me and pay me quite a lot of money. I must sell them my ideas as they can be rather unorthodox and unreasonable sometimes and not easily accepted. I must sell their products through the sales pages and sales funnels I’m writing. I must sell myself on the concept of working hard, through good and bad times, in order to deliver maximum value.

Everything I do is sales. Words are a medium but as opposed to a creative writer or to the profession of a writer by default, I’m a salesman. All people who own companies are. CEOs have more in common with a door to door salesman than they have with a sophisticated economists. This is because, be it at the lowest level or the highest floor, nothing ever happens until someone sells something. Without selling, there is no money, without money, there is no company and this is the end of story.

Why am I’m telling you this?

Because you’re not a coach. You’re not an author. You’re not a trainer. You’re a salesman. Your purpose is to get people to take some form of action in their best interest. When you’re giving a speech, you’re selling the idea behind that speech. When you’re writing a book, you’re selling a philosophy of living. When you’re coaching someone, you’re selling a usually highly skeptical person on doing things that are out of his or her comfort zone, for his or her own sake.

Any business in which ideas or human interaction are exchanged is based on sales. Your success in any field of this kind is based on your ability to get people to buy into your ideas, into your leadership, into your books, products, website, videos, Facebook posts and everything else. ROI is directly tied to your ability to get engagement from someone else be it a like on your Facebook post or a purchase of a $4997 coaching program.

Now I know that sales and persuasion are not the same thing but as you can see, I’m not saying that this is about convincing your children to clean up after themselves or going to sleep. I’m making it clear of how in most service based businesses, that are either sole operated, the ability to sell and get a desired action is the life-force that makes everything else happen.

The old adage of “build a better mouse-trap and they will come” is false. This saying becomes even more inaccurate the more options your prospect has. When there is only a single option available, then he is forced to do business with you. When there are 485 competitors on a 100 kilometers radius, then you would better have a good sales process in place, otherwise, you are left with the bread crumbs.

This leads me to my next point – sitting next to the table and picking the bread crumbs is not a viable competitive strategy or a strategy at all. I know many businesses that exist only because their competitors have run out of capacity to serve the marketplace, because they are too expensive or simply because they don’t want to work with that given niche. These businesses attract what other businesses do not want and have a very low profit margin, these customers tend to be high maintenance and overall, there are not many to begin with.

Let me give you an example. Before moving to Asia, I was living in London but before London, I was living in Romania. Romania is a beautiful country and there’s more to it than vampires. One problem in Romania are taxi drivers. Most hot spots have way too few taxis for the traffic there. This means that it is almost impossible to get a taxi in the city center of Bucharest at rush hour unless you order an Uber or a BlackCab (and these tend to be over-capacity too).

Yet, you will find some cabs, cabs that look the same but cost about 2.5X more than the normal fare. These cabs stay there to take advantage of people who are really in a rush and can not find any other alternative and which are willing to pay 250% the market price in order to get to their destination. The problem with them is that while I encourage the free market, nobody in his right mind will invest in one of these cabs as long as they can get a normal priced one, as they’re not superior in any manner whatsoever. This is the breadcrumbs strategy and while it works, you can clearly see the downsides it has.

And honestly, unless you invent a product that sell itself (which is quite a difficult feat) you either learn how to sell or you must satisfy yourself with the breadcrumbs. You are in sales, no matter if you want it or not. You’re either selling yourself or you have a sales team but the process of lead generation and lead conversion is true in virtually all service based businesses.

I’ve thought that for a long time, I need to get better at writing headlines and marketing bullets. This is a false assumption. The only thing I’m judged for is how many sales I make for my customer. I’m not a branding copywriter. I don’t build brands. Nor am I am Madison Avenue copywriter. I don’t write copy with the purpose of it being descriptive. I’m writing copy because I’m selling with my copy and I’m proud to know that when I write copy, I’m helping my customers, the people who pay me while at the same time, I’m helping countless thousands or tens of thousands of people who are going to buy, by persuading them to take a good decision, in their favor. A doctor feels proud when he convinces people to give up smoking or eat healthier and he has all the reasons to be. I’m proud when I’m selling products for you because I’m convincing people to invest in themselves and in their life.

Can I do the same thing for you? At this moment, there at least five ways in which I can help you sell more. I can identify these five ways usually within the first ten minutes of a conversation. So let’s have this conversation and I’m going to tell you, for FREE, five ways in which you can sell more.

How can we do this? Please use the link below to enjoy a complimentary 30 minute needs analysis session. This session is 100% obligation free and you can book a slot in an convenient time zone.

Click Here For Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call!

Best regards,
Razvan Rogoz
The Self-Improvement Copywriter

Fix Your Marketing Bottlenecks

From the desk of Razvan Rogoz,

I have realized that the 80 – 20 distribution and the TOC (Theory of Constraints) are largely related. This means that in any I/O system, the 20% that generates 80% of the results comes in the form of eliminating the most important system-wide bottleneck.

Life is made out of I/O systems. It is what you put in (input), you get out (output). Everything in human existence can be abstracted to some form of I/O. It is true if you go to the gym – how much you exercise and how much benefit you get from that given exercise. It is true when watching TV, when reading a book, when dating, when running, when eating. Everything in human existence can be summarized to a simple formula “you put effort in and you expect some benefit out of it”.

The 20 – 80 distribution simply states that 20% of what you do creates 80% of the outcome. This is not always true and it can be 30 – 70 or 10 – 90 or even 5 – 95. The key principle is that there is an uneven distribution between cause and effect and a small part of what will do will be highly efficient in obtaining your desired outcome while a large part will be system waste.

The TOC is something not known by most people in the self-improvement field as it is an industrial management concept. It states that a system is always limited by a major bottleneck and that the output with which a system functions is always limited to that given bottleneck. TOC states that bottlenecks needs to be either removed or the systems reconstructed around them in order to achieve a high efficiency without waste.

So how does this combine together? Any system, be it a business, dating, self-improvement, spiritual growth, improving your body is bottlenecked by something. This means that at some point, the effort you put in is reduced to the amount of that bottleneck. Imagine that you have a freeway with cars on all three lanes. At some point, it all converges into a single lane. That’s a bottleneck. The number of cars that can go on that one lane is equal to 1 / 3 of the number of cars that could go before. The entire system is reduced to the bottleneck, therefore reducing efficiency by a factor of 2X or 66.7%.

At that moment, most people take the most lackluster approach, put more input. This means putting more cars. But putting more cars won’t reduce the bottleneck, because a bottleneck is never about input but rather, about how input is dramatically lost to output. Eliminating cars is not a good idea either because yes, if you eliminate 66.7% of the cars, the bottleneck is gone as input equals output but the efficiency is exactly the same as before. This is one of the facets of the TOC, rebuilding the entire system to fit the bottleneck in the case that the bottleneck can not be fixed, as eliminating input costs is just as good as increasing output profits.

The only solution towards improving results is eliminating the bottleneck. This means making that bottleneck a three lane road so I/O once again.

How does this apply to real life? Let’s take the example of a salesman. He calls 100 people a day but he makes only $500 in sales. His conversion rate is only 10% which means 10 out of 100 people buy what he’s selling. Now, an unsuccessful and not so smart sales manager would say “work harder, you don’t want it hard enough, hoooraaaaaahh” as most inspirational and rhetorical blah blah goes. A smart one would simply say “you’re putting enough effort but you’re bottlenecked by your ability to sell. Take a few days off, improving your pitch dramatically, come back and you will get better results”.

This is why I despise most self-improvement posts on Instagram nowadays. They lack any common sense. In a system, your output is not represented by what you put in, but simply by anything under your biggest bottleneck. You’re limited not by your effort, but by your global efficiency and putting 20 hours instead of 10 hours into an inefficient system will give you the same ROI as putting 10 hours. Yes, it will give you more results, because I’m using ROI (return on investment) as a metric and not revenue but the focus for a smart person must always be ROI, what you get in for what you put out.

Bottlenecks are the reason why you’re failing in your life right now. You’re failing because your entire system is limited, is struggling in one key point. Now, you have two solutions. If you can rebuild the system without that key point, then your bottleneck is gone. In some cases, you don’t need to fix the bottleneck, you simply need to eliminate it as a critical step from cause and effect. This means rebuilding the “production line” so the bottleneck is not a required part anymore.

In most cases though, the bottleneck is important and the 20% that will generate 80% of your return is always looking at and fixing that bottleneck. It is not doing more of what you’ve done by taking a hard, critical look at what is keeping you in place and then actually solving it.

So when it comes to setting life priorities, on a day to day level, ask yourself this simple question:

“What is my major bottleneck right now in me achieving goal X?”

“What can I do to either increase this bottleneck (increase I/O ratio through the bottleneck) or eliminate it altogether from the system while obtaining the same results?”

Keep asking yourself these questions day in and day out and you’ll achieve system wide optimization where 1 unit of energy = 1 unit ot desired output in no time.

Are you interested in discovering in finding your bottlenecks when it comes to marketing and conversion? Then let’s have a talk together. I’m offering you a complimentary 30 minute session in which I’ll ask you some key questions about you and your business. After this session is done, I can tell you with a high degree of certainty how I can help you and what you’ll get out of it. Please use the link below to get started.

Click Here For Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call!

Best regards,
Razvan Rogoz
The Self-Improvement Copywriter
www.razvanrogoz.com

Click Here For Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call!

Why You Should Tell Your Story – Even If You Don’t Believe It Is Interesting Enough

From the desk of Razvan Rogoz,

I have realized that the 80 – 20 distribution and the TOC (Theory of Constraints) are largely related. This means that in any I/O system, the 20% that generates 80% of the results comes in the form of eliminating the most important system-wide bottleneck.

Life is made out of I/O systems. It is what you put in (input), you get out (output). Everything in human existence can be abstracted to some form of I/O. It is true if you go to the gym – how much you exercise and how much benefit you get from that given exercise. It is true when watching TV, when reading a book, when dating, when running, when eating. Everything in human existence can be summarized to a simple formula “you put effort in and you expect some benefit out of it”.

The 20 – 80 distribution simply states that 20% of what you do creates 80% of the outcome. This is not always true and it can be 30 – 70 or 10 – 90 or even 5 – 95. The key principle is that there is an uneven distribution between cause and effect and a small part of what will do will be highly efficient in obtaining your desired outcome while a large part will be system waste.

The TOC is something not known by most people in the self-improvement field as it is an industrial management concept. It states that a system is always limited by a major bottleneck and that the output with which a system functions is always limited to that given bottleneck. TOC states that bottlenecks needs to be either removed or the systems reconstructed around them in order to achieve a high efficiency without waste.

So how does this combine together? Any system, be it a business, dating, self-improvement, spiritual growth, improving your body is bottlenecked by something. This means that at some point, the effort you put in is reduced to the amount of that bottleneck. Imagine that you have a freeway with cars on all three lanes. At some point, it all converges into a single lane. That’s a bottleneck. The number of cars that can go on that one lane is equal to 1 / 3 of the number of cars that could go before. The entire system is reduced to the bottleneck, therefore reducing efficiency by a factor of 2X or 66.7%.

At that moment, most people take the most lackluster approach, put more input. This means putting more cars. But putting more cars won’t reduce the bottleneck, because a bottleneck is never about input but rather, about how input is dramatically lost to output. Eliminating cars is not a good idea either because yes, if you eliminate 66.7% of the cars, the bottleneck is gone as input equals output but the efficiency is exactly the same as before. This is one of the facets of the TOC, rebuilding the entire system to fit the bottleneck in the case that the bottleneck can not be fixed, as eliminating input costs is just as good as increasing output profits.

The only solution towards improving results is eliminating the bottleneck. This means making that bottleneck a three lane road so I/O once again.

How does this apply to real life? Let’s take the example of a salesman. He calls 100 people a day but he makes only $500 in sales. His conversion rate is only 10% which means 10 out of 100 people buy what he’s selling. Now, an unsuccessful and not so smart sales manager would say “work harder, you don’t want it hard enough, hoooraaaaaahh” as most inspirational and rhetorical blah blah goes. A smart one would simply say “you’re putting enough effort but you’re bottlenecked by your ability to sell. Take a few days off, improving your pitch dramatically, come back and you will get better results”.

This is why I despise most self-improvement posts on Instagram nowadays. They lack any common sense. In a system, your output is not represented by what you put in, but simply by anything under your biggest bottleneck. You’re limited not by your effort, but by your global efficiency and putting 20 hours instead of 10 hours into an inefficient system will give you the same ROI as putting 10 hours. Yes, it will give you more results, because I’m using ROI (return on investment) as a metric and not revenue but the focus for a smart person must always be ROI, what you get in for what you put out.

Bottlenecks are the reason why you’re failing in your life right now. You’re failing because your entire system is limited, is struggling in one key point. Now, you have two solutions. If you can rebuild the system without that key point, then your bottleneck is gone. In some cases, you don’t need to fix the bottleneck, you simply need to eliminate it as a critical step from cause and effect. This means rebuilding the “production line” so the bottleneck is not a required part anymore.

In most cases though, the bottleneck is important and the 20% that will generate 80% of your return is always looking at and fixing that bottleneck. It is not doing more of what you’ve done by taking a hard, critical look at what is keeping you in place and then actually solving it.

So when it comes to setting life priorities, on a day to day level, ask yourself this simple question:

“What is my major bottleneck right now in me achieving goal X?”

“What can I do to either increase this bottleneck (increase I/O ratio through the bottleneck) or eliminate it altogether from the system while obtaining the same results?”

Keep asking yourself these questions day in and day out and you’ll achieve system wide optimization where 1 unit of energy = 1 unit ot desired output in no time.

Are you interested in discovering in finding your bottlenecks when it comes to marketing and conversion? Then let’s have a talk together. I’m offering you a complimentary 30 minute session in which I’ll ask you some key questions about you and your business. After this session is done, I can tell you with a high degree of certainty how I can help you and what you’ll get out of it. Please use the link below to get started.

Click Here For Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call!

Best regards,
Razvan Rogoz
The Self-Improvement Copywriter
www.razvanrogoz.com

Click Here For Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call!

What’s your story?

I’m asking this almost every person I meet. In most cases, I get blank stares as it is not quite the type of question to start a conversation with. In some rare cases, I do get an answer. This answer comes in the form of a journey that the other person experienced. It is with ups and downs, with moments of courage and cowardice, with joy and pain. In that moment, I know that I’m connecting with that person no matter what, because there are few things more intimately than sharing your story.

And … this is exactly what you need to do with your market. You see, if you’re trading time for money or even if you’re selling information products, your market is not only buying the asset (service or product) you’re delivering. They’re also buying a part of you, your personality, your time, your identity. Selling an eBook or a seminar is a far more personal experience than selling a laptop. They are buying for who you are just as much for what you’re offering. The product may contain the functional benefit, but you’re the charm behind it.

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The Value Of Emotional Pricing

Dear friend & reader,

There is one thing you can do right now which will boost your conversion rate. It is almost guaranteed. It taps into the basic human nature and I’ve used it successfully both for myself and for others.

It is simple – add bonuses to your offer.

When it comes to sales, bonuses alone won’t sell your product. However, bonuses are directly correlated with your closing rate, in other words, decisions to buy. The more you add of them, the more valuable they are to your market, the easier you are going to close the sale.

This is because we, as people, love getting free stuff. We like to pay for something and get something extra. This is present everywhere – be it that we get a Cola with our burger, headsets with our new iPhone or a free dinner at a fancy restaurant when you participate to a workshop.

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Why You Should Charge More For Your Products & Services.

From the desk of Razvan Rogoz
Dear friend,

I’m writing this post for self-improvement authors, trainers and coaches that have been in this field for a while already but are disappointed with their results. If you are just starting out, this may help you but my primary focus is on those that already put a minimum of one year in this field.

This world taught me something not very empowering. This is that you’re supposed to accept who you are, what you can achieve and be happy in your small box. It taught me that “you must” accept faith and that if things have always been in a certain way, things always must be in that way. I’ve learned that consistency for many is a virtue, even when consistency is actually the biggest obstacle that keeps you back.

I’ve learned that most people expect you to be the same, year after year, to tell the same story, to have the same level of success and achievement and generally, to not progress. This is especially true in the solopreneur / coaching industry when it comes to price. If you start at $50/hour, then in the view of most people, this is the rate at which you must stay for the rest of your life. After all, you’re supposed to be consistent.

This belief is what keeps most entrepreneurs down. The truth is that you’re not supposed to be consistent. If you’ve been charging $100 per seat at your seminar and tomorrow you want to start charging $20.000, that’s perfectly okay. What you need to understand is that your value as a coach / speaker is not determined by how much you are charging now but by the value you produce and most people I’ve met over deliver value and undercharge. In other words, they are masters in their fields and yet they charge just as much as complete beginners.

If today your average sale is $100, tomorrow you can change the price to $500 or $1000. Yes, you can do that. There need not be any relationship between your old prices and new prices. There is no one that regulates how much you should charge apart from the market. If the market pays, perfect. If the market doesn’t pay, then you’re offering too little and you’re charging too much.

I know a copywriter who five years ago was charging $1000 per letter. Do you know how much he charges now? A 10% improvement? A 20% improvement? A 100% improvement? He consistently charges and gets between $20.000 and $40.000 for a single sales letter. He knows that what he’s offering is very valuable for the right people so he charges 40 times more now than five years ago.

You need to stop thinking of prices as constant. Your prices increase as you increase your value. If you go to a workshop, read a book, achieved good results for your customers, your value increased and you can charge more. You can give yourself a raise every single time you feel like you want one. Yes, some customers are not going to be satisfied but it is fair to you to charge the same now as you did two years ago? Well, many people do that and worse.

You have the right and the obligation to price yourself based on the value you deliver to the marketplace. The relationship between value and price must always be a constant. You don’t want to be the “best deal” because you’re not WallMart. You’re a professional that is helping change lives and if today you are worth ten times more than one year ago, then charge ten times more. Don’t be afraid of the criticism that this will bring – because there are customers for every price level.

How would it be if Brian Tracy charged as little as he did when he started his career? I don’t know how much he actually charged but I can bet it is not $50.000 per presentation as I’ve heard he’s charging now. How stupid would it be if a Fortune 500 consultant charges as little after ten years of experience as he did after finishing school? It’s not logical and yet, people do it all the time. I see trainers who became amazingly better and haven’t increased their fees. I see writers who improved tenfold and yet, serve their customers at the same rates as when they’ve started.

This is scarcity based thinking! It is saying that you’re afraid that your customers are going to leave you and nobody else will come to your business when you refuse to charge what you’re actually worth. Yes, again, some people are going to be mad and upset about this but the vast majority will be simply be replaced by customers at a new price level and some of the old ones will make the jump too. You need to be brave and say “this is what I’m worth now, this is what I’m charging” and not ask the money of last year with the value of today.

Air carriers use dynamic based pricing. This means that the price constantly changes based on internal and external conditions. They aim to maximize their profits by constantly increasing and decreasing the price. ROI is their goal. I’m not saying to be as dynamic as an air carrier as there are few industries in which that model works well but you can update your fees every six months, three months and maybe even monthly! The only thing that is holding you back is just your fear of being judged for constantly increasing your prices but then you need to ask yourself – if you deliver better services, isn’t it only fair to be better compensated? After all, you are paying the price to improve yourself. Isn’t it only fair your customers pay the price too?

I can’t stress as how important this is because at least half of all life coaches, trainers and speakers I know charge fees as old as one year and in some cases, three to five years. Leaving aside inflation and that $1000 five years ago was a lot more valuable than $1000 is now, they have invested hundreds, thousands of hours in improving their craft and they’re asking for fees for someone that is far inferior them.

I know that you want to serve your customer but there must be a balance. There’s no incentive to get better if you are actually punished for becoming better. It is like a writer working on a hourly fee. If ten years ago, it took me five hours to do something and now it takes me only one, does it make sense to charge for one hour because I’ve improved five times my skills? No. It doesn’t. It’s actually punishing performance. Any improvement in productivity means a lower fee for the customer which may work great when there physical products but it is the worst thing you can do for yourself when you’re trading your time.

Performance should be rewarded, not punished, but you’re the only one that’s in a position to do this. Your customers will pay you what you ask. If you ask $10/hour for your time, there are people who will pay you that. If you ask $1000 per hour, there are people who will pay that too. Your only job is to deliver that value. If you feel like what you’re creating for your customers is worth $5000/hour, then charge $5000/hour. There are psycho-therapists in places like Beverly Hills that charge ten times and even fifty times more than someone in a place like Southern Italy. Your skills, your ability to create value determines what you get paid, not your market. If you feel like you’re worth more, then charge more and go to the people who are going to pay more. It is as simple as that.

That being said, my advice to you is to double your rates, whatever they may be. If you’re charging $25 per hour, double it to $50. If you’re charging $500 per speech, double it to $1.000. You’ll see that you’ll get paid the new fee just as easily as the old one and they’ll be just as satisfied with your services now as they were in the past.

Click Here To Book Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call

I’m here to help you. As a marketing and copywriting expert, I’m in the position to help you with persuasive materials designed to sell your products and services. Let’s have a 30 minutes complimentary talk over Skype to see where are your bottlenecks and how my expertise of direct response copywriting and marketing strategy can eliminate them.

Click Here To Book Your Complimentary 30 Minute Call

Best regards,
Razvan Rogoz
The Self-Improvement Copywriter

How To Position Yourself In An Authentic Manner.

From the desk of Razvan Rogoz
Dear friend,

When it comes to launching your products or services, there are two schools of thoughts. The first one is follow your passion, doing exactly what you feel like doing. The second one is to come with a highly specialized positioning, something that nobody in the market is offering. Neither are true or very valuable, as I’m going to explain below.

Let’s start with the most common advice – follow your passion. This is a good advice. The reason I’m in this niche now, helping self-improvement entrepreneurs is my decision to follow my passion first even if I’m in a less profitable market compared to before. However, your passion must provide commercial value to your marketplace. If your passion is something that nobody is willing to buy, then you have an hobby but not a business. You know what is another passion of mine? Video game development. I am not very keen on playing video games but I enjoy coding and building interactive stories through video games. However, as my skills are not at the level where I can do this competitively, it is just a hobby and not a business.

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How To Maximize Your ROI By Eliminating Wasteful Marketing

From the desk of Razvan Rogoz
Dear friend,

I’m sharing with you a secret now that if you understand, it is going to earn you millions. It will cut your working time in half, it will make your self-improvement business effortless and it will bring you a sense of satisfaction that you’ve never experienced before.

This is the most important and most obvious secret in marketing. It is no rocket science and yet, nine out of ten entrepreneurs fail this simply rule.

The rule is … Go to where your market actually is!

Let me put it this way. Most entrepreneurs try to pitch to everyone except the people that want to buy. They try to convince their friends, their relatives, their network to buy when they’re not interested in buying … while ignoring a huge army of people that have the money, have the interest and actually are aware of the problem you’re trying to solve.

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The Two Factors Required To Succeed As A Self Improvement Author

From the desk of Razvan Rogoz
Dear friend,

Look, being a self-improvement coach or trainer is very popular nowadays. It doesn’t require a lot of accreditations (or any) and anyone can do it. This means that the market is very competitive and to be honest, everyone and his grandma is now a self-improvement coach. Most are broke and have nothing to actually show, in terms of results, but that’s another story.

My point is that you need to find a way to stand out. This is a field where you really must know what you’re doing when it comes to marketing. Most are oblivious to this fact. They think that if their heart is pure and just want to help people, millions will flock to their website and place orders. These are the first to give up this field and start searching for another job.

From 100 people, 90 bring nothing but good intentions. There is no positioning, there is no strategy, there is no USP (unique selling proposition). Most entered this field because someone told them “you’re really good at motivating people, you should build a business out of this”. This is true. If you like people and you’re good at inspiring them, then this is a good field for you. But getting thanks and appreciation is very, very different from getting paid. It is easy to say “you’re great”, it is a lot harder to get $100 instead.

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